The Delhi Metro resumed partial services from Monday, 7 September after nearly six months | Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
The Delhi Metro resumed partial services from Monday, 7 September after nearly six months | Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
Text Size:

New Delhi: After more than five months, the Delhi Metro resumed partial services Monday, with strict regulations in place to maintain physical distancing and hygiene amid the raging Covid-19 pandemic.

On the first day, the Yellow Line, between HUDA City Centre and Samaypur Badli, ran from 7 to 11 am, and will operate from 4 to 8 pm in the second slot. The metro will resume full services from 12 September.

India had gone into lockdown on 25 March to fight the novel coronavirus, and has been gradually ‘unlocking’ since June.

ThePrint’s Suraj Singh Bisht took a ride in the metro from Rajiv Chowk to Qutub Minar Monday to get you a glimpse of what it was like.

People were seen maintaining social distance inside the metro | Photo: Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
Very few people took the metro on its first day back on the tracks, so physical distancing could be easily maintained inside the compartments | Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
At the entry point of each station, there is an automatic thermal scanner with an attached sanitiser | Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
At the entry point of each station, there is an automatic thermal scanner with an attached sanitiser | Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
The few commuters on the trains enjoyed the space in the near-empty carriages | Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
The commuters travelled with ease in the near-empty carriages | Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
One of the new rules for metro services in the pandemic is that passengers must keep a gap of one seat between them, but on the first day, there was more than enough room | Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
One of the new rules for metro services during the pandemic is that passengers must keep a gap of one seat between them, but there was more than enough room on the first day | Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
Bags are to be sanitised at the entry point of a station | Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
Bags are to be sanitised at the entry point of a station | Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
Now, smart cards are mandatory for metro travel as no tokens will be issued, nor will cash transactions will take place, to minimise the risk of infection transmission | Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
Now, smart cards are mandatory for metro travel as no tokens will be issued, and no cash transactions will take place to minimise the risk of transmission of infection| Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
Passengers are given strict instructions to maintain adequate physical distance in the queue to board and disembark the metro, and trains will halt for a longer time at stations to facilitate this | Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
Passengers are given strict instructions to maintain adequate physical distance while standing in the queue to board and disembark. The trains will halt for a longer time at stations to facilitate this | Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
On the first day of the metro services resuming, passengers were extremely careful about distancing, carrying their own sanitisers, and wearing masks | Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
On the first day of the metro services resuming, passengers were extremely careful about distancing, carrying their own sanitisers, and wearing masks | Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
A commuter took a selfie to celebrate the reopening of the metro. Delhiites looked happy that now travelling within the city will be cheaper and easier for many of them | Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint
A commuter took a selfie to celebrate the reopening of the metro. Travelling within the city will be cheaper and easier now for many in the national capital | Suraj Singh Bisht | ThePrint

Subscribe to our channels on YouTube & Telegram

Why news media is in crisis & How you can fix it

You are reading this because you value good, intelligent and objective journalism. We thank you for your time and your trust.

You also know that the news media is facing an unprecedented crisis. It is likely that you are also hearing of the brutal layoffs and pay-cuts hitting the industry. There are many reasons why the media’s economics is broken. But a big one is that good people are not yet paying enough for good journalism.

We have a newsroom filled with talented young reporters. We also have the country’s most robust editing and fact-checking team, finest news photographers and video professionals. We are building India’s most ambitious and energetic news platform. And have just turned three.

At ThePrint, we invest in quality journalists. We pay them fairly. As you may have noticed, we do not flinch from spending whatever it takes to make sure our reporters reach where the story is.

This comes with a sizable cost. For us to continue bringing quality journalism, we need readers like you to pay for it.

If you think we deserve your support, do join us in this endeavour to strengthen fair, free, courageous and questioning journalism. Please click on the link below. Your support will define ThePrint’s future.

Support Our Journalism

Share Your Views

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here